Dutch angle with Dutch tulips

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A Dutch, or canted angle, is a shot in which the camera is tilted to one side so that vertical lines are at an angle with the frame. It may sound trivial, but this is what owed The Third Man, Carol Reed’s masterpiece its reputation. Here’s my attempt at a Dutch angle, with tulips in the foreground; nothing to do with the Netherlands though (greetings to the New King!) the shot was taken in Versailles. In the background is the seventeenth century Saint Louis Cathedral. (note: the photo wasn’t retouched at all; colours, framing and light balance are all untouched)

Dutch Angling (B&W)

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Angling in the river Seine equates, in my mind, to short term suicide … unless they only do this for fun and to hurt poor helpless animals. How cruel Man can be! You’ll notice the Dutch angle aimed at capturing the stairs in the bottom righthand corner of the picture.

The 37 Bridges of Paris

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Today’s challenge is “bridge”. A nice one indeed. There are 37 bridges in Paris. Bridges always make for nice pictures but they tend to be very difficult to capture. This is why I often opt for a Dutch Angle as in the above picture of the Pont Royal, a Regal bridge for sure, built by the inevitable Louis XIV, yet rebuilt many times (1850 for its current state). In fact, when visiting the bridges with a lecturer the other day, I was shocked to learn that almost all the bridges over the river Seine had been rebuilt, including Pont des Arts and Pont Neuf. The latter isn’t only the oldest Paris bridge, it’s in fact the newest. I cross this bridge very often as it’s on the way of Bus 68 which goes from my place in Denfert to my office in Trinité.

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At first I thought I’d have plenty of pictures to show but it took me a while to figure out which ones to choose. Here’s Pont au Change at night. As shown by the “N” insignia, the current version of this bridge was built by Napoleon III in the 1860s. There were quite a few versions of that bridge. It derived its name from the bureau de change which had set up shop on the old bridge (the bridge with the perfume shop in Süskind’s The Perfume” which collapsed in the river in 1616 and burnt to the ground in 1621).

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