Glow

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Joan of Arc glows in the dark opposite the magnificent Regina Hotel in Paris. 

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Above the Alexander III bridge. Pierre Granet’s Prestige in Battle glows in the mid July sun.

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A glow in the dark installation by our neighbours’ group ‘noctambules’ (night-birds) in the Pyrenees. 

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The sun glows through the beautiful 1960s glasswork of the St Jean Bosco chapel in Toulon.


Textures Challenge and The Chestnut Tree Woodshed in the Ariege

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Last night I was waiting for the daily post to be published, but unfortunately, nothing showed up. So I decided to get back to an earlier challenge when Ben Huberman caught me during a slow interval, that is to say during my 2-week zero connection Summer period. I chose the August 2, 2017 challenge and entitled “Textures”. One of my favourite subjects. I chose 2 pictures I shot this summer of a chestnut tree woodshed. The texture of that kind wood is absolutely fantastic. That is not the only advantage of chestnut tree wood. That kind of wood is able to stand out in the rain for ever, and God knows it rains forever in the Pyrenees. There is no need for varnish, nor paint, not anything else. You can leave it out there and it will never rot. The door to our house was made of Chestnut tree wood and it has been around for 150 years. With only a stroke of Walnut oil on it and I’m not even sure that was useful. Lo and behold!

Augirein, Pyrenees

Textures | The Daily Post

The juxtaposition of starkly different textures helped my attempt to capture a narrow strip of beach as if I were shooting a vast river estuary from a plane. The different colors and densities made it look almost like a living map of a faraway, unknown place. Photography is a primarily visual medium, but we can experience it with more than one sense. This week, focus on the tactile element of the objects you shoot, whether it’s one distinct quality — softness, smoothness, graininess, or any other texture you find interesting — or a combination of several within one frame. I look forward to your exploration of texture in your photos this week!

Source: Textures | The Daily Post

Structure And Architecture

Vierzon - Structure

I’ve already made fun of Vierzon even though it’s not charitable. And I had said I would do something to make up for it. The fact is that in the course of a few hours, I made quite a few interesting discoveries there and as I like architecture and abstract photography, the derelict industrial buildings I came across provided quite a few unusual points of views. Here is a series of pictures taken close to La Française, a former industrial firm. In 1959 it was taken over by Case, an American company, just before it went to the dogs.

Vierzon

As tonight’s challenge is “structure“, I found these pictures particularly apt. They are like barebones examples of architectural design from the 1930s, overhauled recently in order to turn the building into a Cinema house (my assumption). 

Vierzon

Modern crucifixion. 

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Barebones I said. Looks like fishbones architecture. 

Vierzon

A broader view of the complex. The industrial buildings of “La Française” where they were producing agricultural machines and vehicles.

Vierzon

Structure again (end of the 19th century this time). Who said that there was nothing to see in Vierzon.Tu as voulu voir Vierzon et tu as vu Vierzon…” (complete with accordion and all, “typically” French even though Brel wasn’t).

As she has expressed the wish to see my summer vacation period pictures published, I’d like to dedicate my pictures to my online pen-friend Heide from Heideblog. She wrote this heart-rending story about Louise Dillery. If you haven’t read it yet, go there then now.

Transient Statuary on Alexandre III Bridge

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Today’s Friday challenge is “transient”. Last Sunday I had decided to walk along the river bank thanks to a meet-up discovery tour of the bridges of Paris. Fine, not really new to me but as you know, I’m grounded here, so I’d rather make the most of it and grow a stiff upper lip. Nonetheless, as I was walking past Alexandre III for the hundredth time, I noticed something that I had never spotted before. People on the bridge were looking like statues, only transient ones, and as the Sun and the heat were so intense (above 100° Fahrenheit and upper 30s celsius) colour photography was an absolute no no. So at the end of the day, I was pretty happy with the result. And here I got my transient statuary on the Alexandre III bridge, and these weren’t made at the turn of the twentieth century.

Law and Order

law and order

We call it July 14th, and foreigners call it Bastille Day. There is no better day in the year for a demonstration of law and order. Mind you, at the moment, it sounds a bit as if it were July 14th everyday what with the constant flow of Police and Army who try, and most of the time manage, to keep us out of harm’s way. Continue reading “Law and Order”

Evanescence

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Last weekend was about evanescence and so was the weekend, evanescent. Even though it was a long one, it disappeared so quickly and we were so busy touring the Riviera with the Wife singing with the the Paris 14th district choir and a symphonic orchestra and me taking pictures that I wasn’t there in time to seize this fleeting moment. Catching up, I went back to this nanosecond in early February when I caught a glimpse of these birds in the sky while every one had their eyes set on the Chinese New Year parade. There was no point in taking the sky, the show was on the street. Yet I pointed my camera upwards and I don’t know how it happened but it seemed all the birds were ideally positioned in the sky to form a figure which I found interesting and only lasted for 1/8000 of a second. What’s that for evanescence?  

Musings About Heritage, Wars and Buildings

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Heritage

“Features belonging to the culture of a particular society, such as traditions, languages, or buildings, that were created in the past and still have historical importance” 

Cambridge Dictionary

Raoul NOrdling

Traditions and languages are rather hard to picture, but buildings are easier and I indulge a lot in that activity I must admit. We’re a bit spoilt for choice in Paris, what with a great number of listed buildings from the 17th century onwards. Most mediaeval buildings were destroyed in the 19th century when Paris was overhauled by Haussmann, but a lot of the 17th and 18th century ones are still there. As above in the district of Notre Dame.

The City survived WWI (despite some bombings which reached the Capital and traces of which can still be seen here and there and namely at the back of La Madeleine). And it survived WWII too but that was a close shave. Von Choltitz was meant to press the red button and Hitler was raving mad: “Brennt Paris?” he barked. Is Paris burning? No it wasn’t, thanks to Franco-Swedish diplomat Raoul Nordling (Orson Welles in the film), the Man who saved Paris.  “Tack Mr. Nordling!”  

Continue reading “Musings About Heritage, Wars and Buildings”

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